Thursday, September 3, 2015

NATION article about police pushback post-Ferguson.

What those who declare a “Ferguson effect” want us to believe is that police need a “free hand” to control crime. Any attempts to end abusive, racist, or illegal police activity is problematic because it interferes with unfettered police power. This is a misunderstanding of the nature of effective policing. Decades of research shows that policing works best when communities support the police, feel respected by them, and accept their actions as legitimate. Second, it throws the Constitution under the bus. Practices like shooting fleeing suspects and stopping and frisking people without reasonable suspicion have been found unconstitutional. To defend these practices as not only necessary but appropriate flies in the face of our legal system and should call into question the loyalties of those who mimic them. Finally, the social costs of racist overpolicing are too high, regardless of effectiveness or legality. No society should be asked to accept the levels of arrest and incarceration being meted out against young people of color in the United States. It tears at the basic social fabric, and is one of the main drivers of increasing social and economic inequality.

The above passage is from the article "No, Protests Against Police Brutality Are Not Increasing Crime" in THE NATION:

It's worth reading in the wake of media coverage of the tragic killings of police in Houston and Chicago intended to "balance" the coverage of police killing suspects in Ferguson, Baltimore, NYC, etc.

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